Legend of Camelot

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Camelot Generic Icon.png

Legend of Camelot is an event in SMITE made to celebrate the introduction of the new Arthurian pantheon and two new gods, King Arthur and Merlin (who also happens to be the 100th god). This event began on January 7, 2019.

Description[edit | edit source]

Lords and Ladies, welcome to the Legend of Camelot Event!

Buying your first 3 Bundles grants you your first exclusive Tyr skin reward. Purchasing all 5 Bundles will grant you the last exclusive Merlin reward skin. Buying your FIRST Legend of Camelot Bundle grants you the player titles, King and Queen, and a one time use 30% off coupon towards your next Legend of Camelot Bundle purchase. Each patch will release a new Bundle with 4 Exclusive items!

The Legend of Camelot event will end once patch 6.5 goes live.

Legend of Camelot Cosmetic Items[edit | edit source]

These are the items that are available during the event. Each bundle costs 900 Gems.png Gems to unlock. Bundles are sold at a 16% discount (750 Gems.png) during the patch that they were released.

Unlocks[edit | edit source]

Dragon Keeper
Icon Type Release Date Description
T Discordia DragonKeeper Icon.png God Skin January 7, 2019 A skin for Discordia. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Blight Guardian
Icon Type Release Date Description
T Athena BlightGuardian Icon.png God Skin January 7, 2019 A skin for Athena. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Excalibur
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot ExcaliburWard Icon.png Ward Skin January 7, 2019 A ward skin.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Arthurian
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot ArthurianRecallSkin Icon.png Recall Skin January 7, 2019 A recall skin.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Knight of Mordred
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot KnightofMordredAchilles Icon.png God Skin Unreleased A skin for Achilles. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Lady of the Lake
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot LadyoftheLakeFreya Icon.png God Skin Unreleased A skin for Freya. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Royalty
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png Global Emote Unreleased A global emote.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Cutesy Pendragon
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png Death Mark Unreleased A death mark.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Gadget Goblin
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot GadgetGoblinCupid Icon.png God Skin Unreleased A skin for Cupid. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Star Commander
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot StarCommanderBellona Icon.png God Skin Unreleased A skin for Bellona. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Cutesy Dragon
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png Avatar Unreleased An avatar.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Mystical Dragons
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png Fountain Skin Unreleased A fountain skin.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Dragon Prince
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png God Skin Unreleased A skin for Ne Zha. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Infinite Seer
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png God Skin Unreleased A skin for Ah Puch. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Avalon
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png Loading Frame Unreleased A loading frame.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Arthurian
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png Loading Screen Unreleased A loading screen background.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Royal Fury
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png God Skin Unreleased A skin for Anhur. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Shell Shock
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png God Skin Unreleased A skin for Agni. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Arthurian Ballad
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png Music Theme Unreleased A music theme.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Knights of the Round Table
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot Generic Icon.png Pedestal Unreleased A pedestal.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Collection bonus[edit | edit source]

Winged Justice
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot WingedJusticeTyr Icon.png God Skin Unreleased A skin for Tyr granted for unlocking 3 bundles. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Master Soulbinder
Icon Type Release Date Description
Camelot MasterSoulbinderMerlin Icon.png God Skin Unreleased A skin for Merlin granted for unlocking all 5 bundles. It has custom animations and ability effects, and custom voicelines.
Discoveries
Story

Video

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Quests[edit | edit source]

There will be 10 quests in total, 2 quests per patch. Completing a quest will grant you 20 Gems.png. For every patch that is released, the last 2 quests will be deactivated. Players can earn a total of 200 Gems.png throught the event.

Arthurian Quest 1
Quest Icon Pantheon Arthurian.png
Requirement
Get 1 First Win of the Day
Reward
20 Gems.png
Arthurian Quest 2
Quest Icon Pantheon Arthurian.png
Requirement
Get 30 Kills and Assists
Reward
20 Gems.png

Arthurian Quest 3
Quest Icon Pantheon Arthurian.png
Requirement
?
Reward
20 Gems.png
Arthurian Quest 4
Quest Icon Pantheon Arthurian.png
Requirement
?
Reward
20 Gems.png

Arthurian Quest 5
Quest Icon Pantheon Arthurian.png
Requirement
?
Reward
20 Gems.png
Arthurian Quest 6
Quest Icon Pantheon Arthurian.png
Requirement
?
Reward
20 Gems.png

Arthurian Quest 7
Quest Icon Pantheon Arthurian.png
Requirement
?
Reward
20 Gems.png
Arthurian Quest 8
Quest Icon Pantheon Arthurian.png
Requirement
?
Reward
20 Gems.png

Arthurian Quest 9
Quest Icon Pantheon Arthurian.png
Requirement
?
Reward
20 Gems.png
Arthurian Quest 10
Quest Icon Pantheon Arthurian.png
Requirement
?
Reward
20 Gems.png

Lore[edit | edit source]

Chapter 1[edit | edit source]

Event1 ScreenBG 001.png

How many deaths can burden a man's soul, before it is undone?

How much blood can be upon his hands, before he can hold nothing, and no one, ever again?

I commit these words now, as I stand upon the threshold of an unknown future, as the truest record possible from the mind of an imperfect man. Listen not to the songs and bard's tales that would leave you rapt with the image of a joyful king who wielded the blade that brought peace and destroyed all evil. Listen instead to the words of a man, not a king, nor a hero, nor a saviour, but just a man who has brought about the loss of everything he has ever held dear.

My name is Arthur Pendragon, son of Uther, and I am the downfall of Camelot.

The days of my birth, of my youth, were ones of blood and fire, of suffering and terror. It is well enough that I was molded by these things, for they would be all that I would ever know.

I became a man in the shadow of my father the King, Uther Pendragon, lord and warden of Camelot. I watched as he devoted his life to bringing order to a land riven by war and division, from the challengers who hungered for his throne to the barbarian hordes that flooded in uncounted from across the seas. I watched and I trained, preparing for the day when I would do the same.

If I had been born in another time, in another place, would I have been a different man? A philosopher? An artisan? A priest? Do such questions even matter? I was born into war, and so I became a warrior.

I was little more than a boy when battle took my father from us, when his great Mage swore himself to me, and he laid the crown upon my head. From that day Merlin never left my side. I draw breath to speak these words only because of him.

You wish to know of the sword. Vaunted Excalibur. Are the legends true, you wonder? Was it forged from a star fallen from the heavens? Was it I who hauled it from a stone, when any other who attempted to failed? Wherever the truth of it lies, what is truly of import is that by that blade was Camelot saved, and in so doing doomed.

Youth has blurred much of those early days, where the noble houses were brought beneath my banner or rendered desolate for their rebellion. Where together we crusaded out, riding down against the shield walls of the foreign marauders and crushing them like the braying beasts that they were. When all you know is war, battles have a way of flowing together, yet there are moments of triumph that crystalize in the mind, as though trapped in amber.

An entire army before me, kneeling in submission.

Merlin flashing his brilliant smile, his face a crimson mask of blood.

The head of a Saxon chieftain, crested in mail and twisting horns, rolling from his shoulders into earth made a quagmire by bloodshed.

These, for all their pain, for all of their horror, were the halcyon days of my life. Camelot was united, with my own successor born behind the safety of her walls. The advance of the hordes had been halted, broken, their warbands poised to be hurled back into the sea from whence they had first appeared. If only I had appreciated such times then, unknowing of the darkness that awaited just over the horizon.

Know that when I speak of the myriad peoples and creeds called Saxons as barbarians, it is from neither arrogance nor spite. One gains an intimacy with a foe when he spends his life dedicated to their destruction. He learns their rituals, their customs, what rallies them to the utmost of their strength and what sends them fleeing from the field in fear. I had spent my life transforming myself into that which the Saxons most fear, the King who had sent thousands of their kin into darkness, wielder of a magic blade so steeped in Saxon blood that it could never be made clean of it.

And in their fear, their desperation, their weakness, the hordes turned to darkness, to ancient secrets and forbidden places that they could neither control nor understand. It was by their hand that the greatest evil imaginable was awakened, but as I contemplate it I wonder, is it they who are to blame, or is it I?

For all the time that I have known him, Merlin was a man who has existed simultaneously within two realms: one of reality, and one of dreams. I cannot count the victories his visions have won, the times where catastrophe was averted by the pain he suffered while the rest of us slept. I trusted him with my life, without question or hesitation, and what he saw, I believed.

For weeks on end Merlin would awake screaming. He would be found by my patrols far from his tent, outside our camp in the hills or deep within the woods quaking, sheened in sweat, and babbling in a tongue none could understand save the urgency with which he spoke it. In time he would make sense, breathlessly pleading of doors unlocking, of secrets meant never to be known, and a single word repeated over and over.

Dragon.

Upon hearing of it, there were many of my warriors who thought this to be an omen of triumph. I was their king, Arthur Pendragon, and the sigil of the mythic beast was writ large upon our shields, our banners, and our hearts. Surely the vision of such a creature meant our inevitable conquest of the Saxons, of hurling them into the sea never to return to plague us. But I could see in my friend's eyes that whatever he had seen, it was not a harbinger of victory.

It was an inferno, unleashed by fools to burn beyond control, until all was in ruins.

I do not remember much of the battle, what was to be the final battle against the Saxons after we had forced their backs to the sea. Only images remain in my mind, sensations. The crunch of clashing shields and shivering spears. The cries of dying men underfoot. The sound of chanting, in the tongue I had only heard from Merlin in his dreams. The spray of salt water, and the cold of a shadow cast over the entire world.

The dragon defied comprehension. There is no other thing I have seen to compare its size to, nor any army to whom I can compare its violence. It seemed indifferent to who it slayed, obeying no master, leaving as many Saxons dead as it did my own warriors. Such was the chaos it sowed that for a few fleeting moments we all joined as men to oppose it, though in the end it did nothing to forestall it.

I remembered waking beneath the crushing embrace of mangled plate and cold flesh. From a mound of my slain brethren I freed myself, finding Merlin and looking east, to see all that I had sought to protect in flames.

As fair Camelot was swallowed in fire around me, I led what remained of my knights into battle against the dragon. Merlin implored me to stall the creature, as he hurried into his vaults to seek out the lore he had long told me was forbidden even to himself. My heart cried out, begging me to find my wife and child and ensure their safety, but duty rooted me in place before the beast. I was the warden of all Camelot, and my oaths demanded I protect all her people, not just those who bore my name. What ruin might have been avoided then, if I had.

Combat against the dragon was a nightmare made real. I watched my champions, men who had torn trees loose from the ground and slain dozens of foes single-handed upon the battlefield torn asunder, broken or boiled away by the monster's foul poisons. I fought on through the screaming, horrid scene, Excalibur a blur as she cut and slashed, willing to fight until the last. I placed my faith in Merlin to deliver us all, I just had to buy him enough time to do so.

When my wizard emerged at last, I heard once more the uncanny, stilted tongue of his dreams and the Saxon war priests. Power radiated from Merlin, great crackling bands of eye-aching silver that burnt the earth black around him. The dragon roared, chained by Merlin's power that surged up and dragged the beast thrashing down into the earth. The ground heaved and quaked in the dragon's throes, the tremors tearing out across Camelot even after it had disappeared.

It was quiet, then. I stood beside Merlin, my last knights broken, leaning upon Excalibur to keep to my feet. The devastation that surrounded me was more than I could fathom, the loss of life appalling. I did not yet know that numbered among the fallen in the flames lay Guinevere, my Queen and the keeper of my heart.

I asked Merlin, when the terrible silence that had descended became too much to bear, what he had done.

“I could not destroy it,” Merlin rasped, near death from the effort of the spell he had conjured. “I could only send it away, to another place far from here.”

For one year I went about my shattered kingdom, driving out the last roving bands of the Saxons and doing what I could to haul my people back from the ashes. Lawlessness and despair had infected my lands in the wake of the cataclysm, and if only I had known had deeply it had rooted itself, I would have rode for home.

I had entrusted my son, Mordred, to the safety of Camelot's walls, as much as we had rebuilt them. There were few bastions left in my realm then, but of them all the seat of my throne was the strongest. But no walls, no matter their height or strength, could protect from a blackness that stained one's heart.

My knights and I had freed a chain of villages from the tyranny of a bandit lord when I received word of what my son had done. The news reached me that I had been overthrown, and that Mordred sat upon the throne of Camelot. And what was more, that he sought not to rule over my people, but finish the terrible work that the dragon had begun.

And so we made speed for home, to see for myself the madness that had taken hold of my blood, and what I would have to do to stop him.

I can almost see you now, imagining a duel upon some sun-kissed glen, where a noble king stood resolute against a dark usurper. The very image of good versus evil. But that is not what transpired. There is no song sung about a father, bleeding in the mud and rain, as he killed his only son.

I have spoken of my memory failing. I suppose this is the consequence of the warrior's life, for not all of the scars we bear can be seen with the eye. Yet for all that I have forgotten, I remember that day with perfect clarity, though for all my heart I wish I did not.

Mordred had grown into a man while I had been out on campaign, and the sight of him sent a tremor through my heart. He had all of the best from my Queen and I, my strength and will, joined with her wit and vision. He should have been a philosopher king, garbed in the robes and laurels of the ancient ones who once lived amongst us, a maker of laws and consensuses to be adored by all our people.

Mordred the Just. Mordred the Wise.

He stood before me, the rain lashing down against his dark plate, sluicing from the blade of the sword drawn at his side.

“My son,” I said, refusing to bring Excalibur from her sheath. “Mordred, what have you done?”

“You were gone, for most of my life,” he answered, his eyes downcast, his voice low but soft. “But those times you were here with me, I etched every word you said into memory. As though they had come down from heaven.”

“Mordred—”

“You told me once, that I could never lose a game that I did not choose to play. I say to you then, if you came across a child, dying and screaming from an affliction, with no hope to ever be made well, what would you do? I would smother that child, and bear the sin of such an act upon my own soul, because I know that would be not madness, but mercy.”

“This is no game,” I said. “And this is no rhetorical exercise. Tell me what you have done.”

“The dragon will return,” said Mordred, his eyes still cast to the ground. “He will come and there is nothing that can stand against it. We are presented then with a choice, are we not father? Shall we enter oblivion on our own terms, or those of a monster?”

“Mordred,” I made to embrace him, but he raised his sword between us.

“It is no choice at all. If our King lacks the courage to do so, then I will be that shepherd for us all. I will be the one to lead our brothers and sisters, as we walk hand in hand into extinction.”

“Turn back from this path, while you still can,” I pleaded. “We can protect them.”

“Is that what you said to mother?” He looks at me then, with her eyes, and I am almost undone. “That is what she believed, and where is she now? We will all join her, soon enough. Will you help me, father?”

“Mordred, please,” I ask one last time, feeling Exaclibur's weight at my side. “Do not make me do this.”

“I am not making you do anything, father. None will make this choice save you, and it will be only you who will take its weight upon your soul.”

Ask any man what makes a king, and they will speak of crowns, of riches, of titles. I cannot blame them for this, because there is little else they see. It is only those who rule who know that what makes a king is duty. An oath, and a debt to see the lives of his people kept safe and made better by his rule. That he must sacrifice anything, even that which he loves most, to preserve the kingdom. And though it broke my heart, that day I drew my sword, and did what a king must.

The songs say that it was Excalibur in my hand that took Mordred's life, but like so much else that is told of that day, it was not. The moment I could not convince him to stand beside me, to hope, I killed my only son. And may that failure follow me to the end of my days.

When it was over, I took him in my arms and held him until he was gone. Then I picked him up and carried him home. He lies in the crypts beneath Camelot now, at rest beside his mother.

The years that followed the death of my son were ones of rebuilding, of reclaiming the lands and the souls of my people from all of the darkness that had consumed them. Camelot became my only goal, with each man, woman and child dwelling within her my family and their prosperity my crusade. They would know a kind and dutiful king, generous and beneficent to the crowds, never witness to the melancholy within me. I devoted every part of myself to them, though in honesty I admit my motives were far from selfless. I was desperate to atone, to burn away the sins of my past as a crucible cleanses the impurities from gold, so that one day I might hope to know peace.

Merlin became similarly devoted, turning inward in isolation for solace as I sought it amongst the realm. Weeks, months would pass without sight of him, so consumed he was by his texts and ancient lore. I would glimpse him briefly, readying for great journeys beyond the kingdom, though in search of what he would not say, and that he could only go alone.

The kingdom began to restore itself. Peace remained a fleeting thing, with the tide still bearing disparate warbands of Saxons coming from across the seas to raid. The battles were short, though, for I rode in the vanguard of every charge, breaking every shield wall, leaving none alive. This was not vengeance, for one cannot repay a debt for something that is beyond value. No, my fury was spent in penance for what I had allowed the Saxons to unleash upon my people.

In time, the ranks of my knights were replenished, and armies levied in times of need to protect our frontier. Perhaps my wizard had been waiting for this, before he began to speak to me of Avalon.

Merlin's tower was the tallest structure in Camelot, soaring up high enough to rake the rainclouds as they drifted across the sky. And yet its greatest treasures were not stored at its peak, but rather deep below the earth.

I followed Merlin down the spiral leading to his vaults, my plate clicking against the ancient stone steps. My breath feathered out in front of me, even though the winter was still long away. There was much to the mage's ways that few outside his ilk could understand, and I had long since made peace with such things, placing my trust in my oldest friend.

“Nearly there,” Merlin said, his words echoing bizarrely from the walls. “Just a little further down.”

We finally came to the entrance to his vault. I frowned upon seeing it, a simple door made of mouldering timber. Sensing my thoughts, Merlin offered me a sly grin, and made an intricate gesture before the door with his hands.

A deep thunk sent a tremor through the ground up my boots, and I spun, my hand moving to the grip of Excalibur, as the wall behind me unfolded. The very stone changed, turning liquid like molten silver to form a long, shadowed tunnel.

“One can never be too careful with his secrets,” said Merlin as he entered the tunnel.

I looked back at the timbre door behind us. “What happens if you open that door?”

“That door?” Merlin looked back over his shoulder. “Oh, you'd rather not know, trust me. Now come.”

Merlin snapped his fingers, wreathing his hand in fire that illuminated the passageway. We walked for what felt like hours, our path winding and branching and twisting until I lost all sense of direction, yet Merlin led by heart.

“How much longer?” I asked.

“What do you mean?” Merlin smiled. “We are here.”

I looked around, suddenly finding myself not within the dark tunnel but a great vaulted chamber. The walls were filled with tomes, scrolls and parchments, with exotic totems and bizarre items occupying plinths and tables scattered across the room. At its centre was a simple stone altar, with my sigil etched into it.

“Ah,” said Merlin, seeing what had occupied my attention. He stepped aside, following a pace behind as I came to stand before the altar.

“Of all the things I have found in my travels,” said Merlin as he gestured to the altar. “This bears the most power.”

“What is it?” I asked. I ran a hand over the dusty stone in a soft rasp of plate, feeling a power that I could sense yet not define.

“It is…difficult to describe,” replied Merlin, an answer he often resorted to with me. “Think of it as a doorway.”

“A door to where?”

“To Avalon,” Merlin met my gaze. “The realm of gods and monsters. I have seen it in my dreams. I believe that the dragon originated from this place, and that is the only reason why I was able to banish it there.”

Merlin's voice grew sombre. “It has filled my dreams again. I believe that whatever power I used to supress the creature is now gone, and that it is free to wreak havoc once again.”

I turned to him. “If that is so, we owe this land a debt for what we have done.”

Merlin nodded. “I figured you would think as much. I must warn you, though. I do not know what awaits us should we travel there, and I can offer you no guarantee that once there, we will be able to ever return home again.”

I looked back to the altar, the resolve becoming steel within my heart. “If that is our fate, then let it be so. Open the door, Merlin. I have a dragon to slay.”

Videos[edit | edit source]